Mourning Harvey Levine: B'nai Brith's Quebec Director was a gem

I am deeply saddened to share the news that Harvey Levine, longtime CSL resident and the director of B'nai Brith Canada in Quebec, has lost his battle with cancer.

Harvey was the brother of former CSL City Councillor Allan J. Levine and an extraordinary individual whom I am proud to say I had a very close relationship with,  notably via his role with B'nai Brith.

MikeHarvey
Harvey and myself in a summer 2019 photo.

 

B'nai Brith Canada has been active in Canada since 1875 as the Jewish community's foremost independent human rights agency. "People Helping People" is their motto with community projects, affordable senior housing, and other charitable endeavors. Harvey was the Quebec Regional Director since 2014. Prior to that he was involved with the organization for decades. Under his leadership,he maintained the B’nai Brith office in Côte Saint-Luc. He played an important role in the construction and realization of Chateau B’nai Brith, a subsidized residence for seniors. Over the years he was an ardent defender of the community, speaking out against acts of antisemitism and intolerance. He built bridges with other intercultural communities.

On a daily basis Harvey responded to antisemitic incidents, media requests and outreach to various groups, participating actively in annual audit of antisemitic incidents, overseeing Quebec community and governmental affairs and special projects as well community volunteer service projects, fundraising and the coordination of volunteers.

Previously, Harvey was an award-winning volunteer and member of B’nai Brith for over 45 years. He was a past president of the Maple Leaf Lodge of B’nai Brith Canada and more recently an advisor and trustee. In addition he continuedd to chair the annual Chanukah candle lighting project at the Jewish General Hospital.

As a professional, Harvey was a senior executive in the pharmaceutical, medical publishing and communications industries, a past president and honorary life member for the Pharmaceutical Marketing Club of Quebec, a past president of The Canadian Association of Medical Publishers and a past vice-chair of the Marketing Section of the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association of Canada.

Last winter Harvey was recognized with the Lifetime Achievement Award by the City of Côte Saint-Luc and he participated in the virtual ceremony.

Born and educated in Montreal, he was married to Doreen and the father of two daughters.

Harvey kept his illness very private, not looking for  sympathy and he kept on working. "I have to Mike," he told last fall. "I need to focus my mind on something positive."

D'Arcy McGee Liberal MNA David Birnbaum worked closely with Harvey over the years. ""I offer my deepest sympathies to the friends and family of Harvey Levine," he said. "Harvey was a stalwart in the fight against anti-Semitism and for equal access to justice and freedom for all. He was also a friend and colleague."

CSL Mayor Mitchell Browntein added this: "Harvey was a best friend to our city, speaking up against antisemitism and intolerance as well as ensuring affordable housing for our seniors in our city. He was respected by all as a kind caring person always ready to serve his community with passion."

Mount Royal Liberal Member of Parliament Anthony Housefather also worked a lot with Harvey. "As Quebec Regional Director of B’nai Brith Canada Harvey was a leader in the fight against antisemitism," he said. "We worked together on many files and he was a kind and erudite and determined man who cared deeply about his community. My deepest sympathies to Doreen and his whole family."

Michael Mostyn, Chief Executive Officer of B’nai Brith Canada, state: " Harvey was passionate in his love for the Jewish community and for Israel,” said . “For decades, during the Chanukah holiday, Harvey was always so proud to lead a group of volunteers, including the teenagers who represent the next generation, to the hospital – going room to room and bringing a little sunshine to those who were going through serious health challenges.

“That’s just who Harvey was. He was a mensch through and through, and he always had a love for B’nai Brith in his heart. He will be missed by us all, and we extend our deepest condolences to his wife, Doreen, his two daughters and his entire family.”

Eric Bissell, Honorary President for Life of B’nai Brith Canada, played a major role in hiring Harvey for the Quebec post in 2013. “He loved his work and dedicated himself to fighting antisemitism for B’nai Brith,” Bissell said. “He was a great spokesman. He was enthusiastic about Israel advocacy. . All the things that were important to B’nai Brith were important to him. He had great enthusiasm, great zeal and wonderful dedication. He could lighten up a room with his smile and his exuberance.”

Ted Greenfield, Past President of B’nai Brith Canada, said Harvey was “a very devoted, very caring kind of person. Very respectful. He enjoyed life, cared a great deal about the issues that affected the Jewish community and, in fact, the issues that affected everyone.”

Last summer Matthew Ross joined the local team as associate director and Harvey, recognizing his own fate,  worked closely to help show Matthew the ropes. Harvey's right arm was Janna  Minikovich. The two were almost inseparable at community events and made a fantastic team. I am sure Matthew and Janna will make Harvey proud.

Good-bye friend. You will be terribly missed!

 

 

 


Birnbaum’s team gets it right with 2021 D’Arcy McGee National Assembly Citizenship medals

D’Arcy McGee Liberal MNA David Birnbaum is an out of the box thinker and as someone with a communication background, he has a knack for shining the spotlight on his constituents.

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David Birnbaum

Seven years ago he introduced the D’Arcy-McGee-National Assembly Citizenship Medals. The ceremonies each June have been moving and memorable.

I am very excited to be the first person to unveil this year’s three recipients: a much-loved and respected city councillor, a mental-health and wellness pioneer and a determined patients’-rights advocate and life-long teacher.

It is  still hard for me to believe that Ruth Kovac is no longer with us. She lost a hard-fought battle with cancer a year and a half ago. Ruth was a friend and colleague, someone I miss dearly! So kudos to the Birnbaum team and the selection committee for  deciding to honour her posthumously.

Ruth
The late Ruth Kovac

 

Ruth was a Côte St-Luc City Councillor from 1990 until 2019 and her untimely passing. Exceptionally dedicated to her city, her community and a host of worthy causes, she was known and loved for her determination, compassion and hard work. During her years of public service, she initiated an annual blood-donor clinic, served as long-time president of the Mount Sinai Hospital Auxiliary, national secretary for Maccabi Canada and co-chair of the CSL Demerger Committee. She was a long-time activist and leader in the defence of English-speaking community concerns. A devoted daughter, mother, wife and grandmother, Ruth had an infectious smile and warmth that is deeply missed by all whom she touched. 

The other two recipients are Beverly Spanier and  Ella Amir.

Beverly has been a determined and tireless advocate for residents of the Maimonides Geriatric Centre, where she has resided since 2015. Her lifetime commitment to and aptitude for supporting her fellow citizens has been focused on the welfare and protection of her fellow residents during the deeply stressful circumstances that marked the pandemic at the centre. Whether the issue was access to caregivers, to

Spanier
Beverly Spanier

second-vaccine doses or religious services, Beverly was tenacious and unyielding in her quest for answers that could comfort and reassure her fellow residents and their families. Those same qualities have guided Beverly throughout her life as a dedicated and caring teacher, volunteer and union activist. She is a past recipient of the Eshet Chayil Award from Congregation Shaar Hashomayim.  Beverly, or  “Miss Spanier” as we called her, was my economics teacher at Wagar High School dare I say more than 40 years ago.

Ella, a native of Israel, has been the executive director of AMI-Québec Action on Mental Illness since 1990. Under her guidance and leadership, AMI-Québec serves hundreds of families in French and English, through counselling programs for caregivers, school outreach programs and

EllaAmir
Ellla Amir

education sessions for those struggling with mental illness. An often-published expert on mental-health issues, Ella is a Diamond Jubilee Medal recipient and a Member of the Order of Canada. Significantly, she coordinated AMI-Québec’s transition to virtual services, ensuring that her vast and vulnerable clientele remained fully connected during this difficult pandemic. She has served on numerous boards and advisory councils in helping to spread knowledge and availability of mental-health services.  

You can watch the virtual ceremony on  Tuesday, June 15th at 6:30 p.m.  Here is the one-stop link to attend:   https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88362095407?pwd=eUJvUjk0S3h1cXBiWGhJblRCenJqUT09)

The final selections were made by a jury comprised of last year’s winners: David Lisbona, Jean-Sébastien Patrice (on behalf of MultiCaf) and Sima Paris. This is the seventh annual edition of the awards program.

“There is such a rich tradition of volunteer and community leadership in this riding,” noted Birnbaum. “Our three winners for 2021 have distinguished themselves throughout their lives as proud examples of that tradition. “I am proud to have instituted this National Assembly medals program back in 2015. It allows us to recognize those in the D’Arcy-McGee riding who have given so much back in service of their fellow residents. I hope that, as every year, many members of the community will join us for the medals ceremony.”

CBC Daybreak host Sean Henry will serve as master of ceremonies for the event, and a musical interlude will be offered by Joanna Cutler and her Que Sera ensemble (www.joannecutler.me).


Electors 70 years of age and older will be able to vote by mail in November municipal elections

At last week's monthly public council meeting, we unanimously adopted a resolution which will permit electors aged 70 and over to vote by mail in the November 7, 2021 municipal election.

I worked diligently with Mayor Mitchell Brownstein and our Assistant City Clerk Jason Prevost to lobby the provincial government to allow this, in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic. We must thank  our Liberal MNA David Birnbaum, who worked with his party's Municipal Affairs Critic Marie-Claude Nichols, to push this through. It was a compromise. We felt that everyone should have this right.  Regrettably, the Union of Quebec Municipalities failed us miserably. Initially,  the CAQ government was only going to permit vote by mail for seniors living in CHSLDs or private nursing homes and people with reduced mobility who can’t travel.

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During hearings for the bill, the UMQ merely accepted that option and ignored communications from people like me to take a more aggressive stance. Shame on them! You can read their pitiful response below. Essentially it says they accepted that compromise and that there were too many obstacles to go any further. Well lucky we had David Birnbaum to turn to. In Montreal, Mayor Valerie Plante is resisting requests for vote by mail for 70 plus from the opposition.

Here is the UMQ  response to the initial CAQ plan: "This piece of legislation allows the most vulnerable people to exercise their right to vote by absentee ballot while remaining in their homes. This is very good news. In an ideal world, it would have been desirable for this measure to be extended to the entire population. However, there are a number of logistical and organizational constraints that we believe may affect the integrity of the vote, especially with the limited timeframe we have before us. We do not want municipalities to be used as a pilot project for large-scale absentee voting. For the Union, it was essential that the expansion of absentee voting be allowed to occur while ensuring the integrity of the vote. It is this balance that Bill 85 has managed to achieve." 

Clearly, according to the UMQ, a global pandemic is not the time to enact a vote by mail system.

During the electoral period beginning in September, electors will have to request to get a ballot they can mail in. The number of advance polling days will also be expanded.

You can watch our commentaries on the resolution at the 1:15 mark of this video from our council meeting.

Below are the complete resolutions

RESOLUTION TO ALLOW VOTING BY MAIL FOR ELECTORS 70 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER FOR THE 2021 MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS

WHEREAS the National Assembly of Quebec passed Bill 85 on March 25, 2021 entitled An Act to facilitate the conduct of the 7 November 2021 municipal general election in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic;

WHEREAS the Act to facilitate the conduct of the 7 November 2021 municipal general election in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic authorizes the Chief Electoral Officer to modify, by regulation, a provision of the Act respecting elections and referendums in municipalities (C.Q.L.R., chapter E-2.2.) (“Act”) including voting by mail for electors 70 years of age and older;

WHEREAS on April 30, 2021, the Regulation amending certain municipal provisions to facilitate the conduct of the municipal general election of November 7, 2021, in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic (“Regulation”) was published on the Gazette officielle du Québec;

WHEREAS the Regulation modifies the Act to include the possibility to allow, by request, voting by mail for electors 70 years of age and older where a resolution of a municipality is passed by virtue of par. 2 of section 659.4 of the Act;

WHEREAS the adoption of this resolution by the Côte Saint-Luc City Council will satisfy the requirement of the Act to allow voting by mail, by request, for Côte Saint-Luc electors 70 years of age and over;

WHEREAS it is in the interest of Côte Saint-Luc's democracy that electors have more alternatives to exercise their right to vote given the City’s high population density and high population of senior citizens;

WHEREAS allowing voting by mail is a safe way for electors to exercise their right to vote in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and will increase voter turnout;

It was

MOVED BY MAYOR MITCHELL BROWNSTEIN
SECONDED BY COUNCILLOR MIKE COHEN AND THE REMAINDER OF COUNCIL

AND RESOLVED:

"THAT the Côte Saint-Luc City Council adopts the present resolution to allow any elector 70 years of age or older to vote by mail by request as it is permitted by the Regulation and the Act."

RÉSOLUTION POUR PERMETTRE LE VOTE PAR CORRESPONDANCE AUX ÉLECTEURS DE 70 ANS ET PLUS AUX ÉLECTIONS MUNICIPALES 2021

ATTENDU QUE l’Assemblée nationale du Québec a adopté le projet de loi 85 le 25 mars 2021 intitulé la Loi visant à faciliter le déroulement de l’élection générale municipale du 7 novembre 2021 dans le contexte de la pandémie de la COVID-19;

ATTENDU QUE la Loi visant à faciliter le déroulement de l’élection générale municipale du 7 novembre 2021 dans le contexte de la pandémie de la COVID-19 autorise le Directeur Général des Élections à modifier par règlement une disposition de la Loi sur les élections et les référendums dans les municipalités (R.L.R.Q., chapitre E-2.2) (« Loi ») dont notamment afin de permettre le vote par correspondance pour les électeurs âgés de 70 ans;

ATTENDU QUE le 30 avril 2021, le Règlement modifiant certaines dispositions en matière municipale afin de faciliter le déroulement de l’élection générale municipale du 7 novembre dans le contexte de la pandémie de la COVID-19 (« Règlement ») a été publié à la Gazette officielle du Québec;

ATTENDU QUE le Règlement modifie la Loi afin d’inclure la possibilité pour les électeurs âgés de 70 ans et plus de voter, sur demande, par correspondance lorsqu’une résolution est prise par la municipalité en vertu de l’alinéa 2 de l’article 659-.4 de la Loi;

ATTENDU QUE l’adoption de la présente résolution par le conseil municipal de Côte Saint-Luc permettra de satisfaire l’exigence prévue dans la Loi permettant le vote par correspondance sur demande aux électeurs de Côte Saint-Luc âgés de 70 ans et plus;

ATTENDU QU’il est dans l’intérêt de la démocratie de la Ville de Côte Saint-Luc que les électeurs disposent de plus d’alternatives pour exercer leur droit de vote compte tenu de la forte densité de population de la Ville et du nombre élevé de personnes âgées dans la Ville dans le contexte de la pandémie de la COVID-19;

ATTENDU QUE le fait de permettre le vote par correspondance est un moyen sécuritaire pour les électeurs d'exercer leur droit de vote dans le contexte de la pandémie de COVID-19 et qu'il augmentera le taux de participation des électeurs;

   Il fut

                          PROPOSÉ PAR LE MAIRE MITCHELL BROWNSTEIN

                           APPUYÉ PAR LE CONSEILLER MIKE COHEN

               ET RÉSOLU :

« QUE le conseil municipal de Côte Saint-Luc adopte la présente résolution afin que la Ville de Côte Saint-Luc permette à tout électeur de 70 ans et plus de voter, sur demande, par correspondance, tel que lui permet la Loi et le Règlement. »

 

 

 


From reduced speed zones to plans to beautify the empty lot we have many plans for Marc Chagall Avenue

There is a lot of activity to take note of on Marc Chagall Avenue.

For starters, I advocated strongly for more safety measures to be taken by our Traffic Committee. We have lowered the speed limit to 30 km/h. New signs will be installed soon.  A seasonal speed bump will be installed  closer  to the snow dump. At the turnaround,  work began this week on a bump out sidewalk aimed at slowing motorists down near the  cross walk. This was closely studied by traffic engineers before implementation.

 

Sidewalks
Work is underway with the sidewalks.

 

The broken sidewalk near the Equinoxe is finally being replaced. We also expect the Equinoxe owners to complete the landscaping in front of their buildings. And yes, still with the Equinoxe, it was their responsibility to return the lot across from the Marquise, which was used for parking the past three summers, to greenspace.  Equinoxe contractors  levelled and hydroseeded the land in the fall and it clearly failed to take. They have  now started   another cleanup and seeding. If all goes well, we should see grass by the end of May

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We hope to see new grass on this lot very soon.

 

Once the grass appears, Public Works will be installing some benches, tables, bushes and flowers. Last fall we installed a paved road to the entrance of Isadore Goldberg Park so that all residents on Marc Chagall have access. Goldberg Park is furnished with some new play equipment, benches, tables and beautiful tree. New sand was added in 2020. Lighting and fencing will be installed over the summer/fall.

“So the community at Marc Chagall will enjoy a place to stroll through, a park with toys for children and grandchildren and a small parkette towards City Hall and the library,” reports Public Works Director Beatrice Newman. “The people who live on this street will finally enjoy beautiful days in beautiful areas throughout the summer in their neighbourhood.”

Some people have asked me about the snow dump and when the filthy mountain of solid snow will be chopped up. We hire a contractor for the snow dump and we have basically one shot. We need several weeks of warm weather before  it can be broken up so that might not be until June.

I think we are all thrilled that this will mark the first time four years that we will not have to face  summer of construction at the Equinoxe as  the two towers are completed. Just a reminder to anyone who is not aware, but that land was zoned for two high rises more than 30 years ago.

Stonesvideotron

Finally, Videotron recently did some work on the street and they left   three sets of rock-filled holes in the ground. We are now after them to put those surfaces (see above) back to their original position.


Remembering Steve Acre: a very special person and constituent with one heck of a backstory

In my 16 years as a city councillor, I have met few constituents like Steve Acre. He was that special kind of human being who would call and e-mail me so often with concerns and suggestions, that when that communication stopped most recently I started to worry.

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Steve Acre

 

Today I learned that Steve passed away and my heart is broken. He was an unequivocal supporter of mine, providing unsolicited donations to my election campaigns. Almost four years ago, right after sitting shiva for his dear wife, he withstood a long lineup at advanced polls to vote for me. In recent conversations he was excited to hear that Mayor Mitchell Brownstein and I were pushing for a vote by mail procedure this November. The Quebec government will indeed allow this for those 70 and over. Steve would have qualified.

Steve had a tremendous backstory, which I wrote about on my blog in 2011. The Rembrandt Avenue resident was  a successful insurance executive.  

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Steve and Leila at their wedding.

Steve loved surfing the internet and he would regularly sound out mass e-mails to all of his friends on a wide variety of topics. He served on my District Advisory Council and attended meetings with great enthusiasm, always voicing his opinion. I credit Steve for pushing me on traffic measures we took with the lights at Cavendish and Kildare and the new stop sign we installed at Rembrandt and Kildare just less than three years ago

I checked my account and the last e-mail from Steve came at the end of December after he read my Year in Review blog. “What a year that was,” he stated. “Lots of things happened and you were in the thick of it. Happy New Year!”

I am attaching  this fascinating article which appeared  in AMI Magazine about Steve and his memories of hardship growing up as a Jew in Iraq. He was just nine years old when he witnessed the horrible massacre of Jews, known as the Farhud.There are photos of Steve in different attire. The one in Arab clothing was taken just before he escaped in 1949.  This is an important story to tell about how minorities were treated in Arab lands.

After leaving Iraq Steve wound up as a  refugee to Israel and in 1949 he graduated in the first class of Air Traffic Control in the Israeli Airforce, then became secretary to the foreign attaché in Burma. A world traveller in his early twenties, his obituary reads, it was a whirlwind romance in 1957  that saw him making a life in Montreal. Always proud of his heritage as a Babylonian Jew, a founding member of Beth Tikvah synagogue in Dollard-des-Ormeaux, a former president of the West Island Lodge of B’nai Brith, a long-time member of the Spanish & Portuguese Synagogue and lately Congregation Dorshei Emet, he was always up for a song or a dance and delighted in the company of all people, where he could inevitably start an interesting conversation.

Always curious about the world, magic and the paranormal, Steve could find a subject to talk about in any situation. He loved new inventions and held inventors and creators in high regard. Predeceased by his wife of sixty years, Leila Azoulay, he will be laid to rest by her side in Dollard-des-Ormeaux where they resided for over forty years. Described by a close colleague as a “Prince” among men, he was generous, courageous, and principled and we are a lesser world for having lost him.  

 A private graveside service will take place.  I extend my deepest condolences to Steve’s family and I  dedicate my next election campaign in his memory.


Meeting held with senior CP Railway officials to deal with train noise

In a show of force, Mayor Mitchell Brownstein, Mount Royal Liberal MP Anthony Housefather, Riding Office Senior Advisor Sonny Moroz, Councillor Dida Berku and our City Manager Jonathan Shecter  met with four senior officials from Canadian Pacific Railway by video conference today. Thanks to the Mayor for

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Our meeting with CP.

CP was represented by their Stacy Patenaude, Manager, Government Affairs and Communications and Nathan Cato, Director, Government Affairs and two key Operation Managers, Ben Serena and Guy Seguin.

During my 16 years on council, and well before that, meetings between the city and CP over train news have been quite common. But this meeting was a bit different. Residents of Merrimac, Baily Road and parts of Hampstead have been repeatedly woken up at the ungodly hours near 3 am in recent weeks. This has impacted  constituents of myself, Councillor Berku and MP Housefather – our former mayor. Rather than approach CP on a piecemeal basis, we  included the mayor and the city’s senior director to make the case.

We reminded them that the last time the noise was this bad in 2017 CP put a stop to it.  Resident Charles Guerin has been collecting written complaints from people and we presented these to them.

“Shunting and banging at 3 am is unacceptable,” stated Housefather.

We believe the message was delivered loud and clear. They agreed to review the list of complaints and demands which were presented and  to investigate the sources of noise and disruption and get back to the city within the next few weeks. So a full investigation has now begun.

Citizens upset by the noise who have yet to write to Guerin can do so at cguerin@icloud.com

Please provide the following:

1) Name
2) Home address
3) What you are hearing (Train idling, banging, bells, horns, etc...)
4) What time of night you are hearing it.

We also ask you to go online at CP's Community Connect. The link is here.


Tenders adopted and it is now a go for Rembrandt Park basketball court facelift

It is hard to believe that just more than a decade ago when I would take my regular walks through Rembrandt Park, I’d often hear comments to the effect that the basketball courts should be removed. This came mainly from seniors and even some residents of Merrimac.

Well, in recent years the number of young families living in the immediate vicinity has grown substantially and these basketball courts have gained popularity. The problem is they are in dire need for a facelift and that is what I advocated at the Council table. Parks and Recreation, Engineering and Public Works heard my cry and a renovation job was placed into our Capital Expenditures budget four years ago. There are a lot of requests and we must wait our turn.

Users of all ages kept asking me, “when will these courts be fixed?”  I promised it would be done by 2021 and last November we got the green light to go to tender. Engineer Dalia Mohamed, Parks and Recreation Director  Cornelia Ziga and our Legal Counsel for Procurement Andrea Charon worked exceedingly hard on this project. The original budget was $70,000 and after receiving several informal equipment quotes, Dalia asked Cornelia to present a business case to  our  Finance Department, which was approved  for an extra $15,000.

I have been fortunate to be able to count on some solid advice from constituents Alex Fyon and Kevin Fuks. Their  JHoops organization runs leagues, after school programs, summer camps and more. Kevin has been playing basketball at Rembrandt for more than 20 years. They are very invested in these courts. They will join other regulars like 18 year old Shai Troy, whom I first met when he was two,  to form the first ever Rembrandt Park Basketball Advisory Committee. 

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Shai Troy and Daniel Ohayon are among those excited to see this court get a much needed facelift.

 

Next week, along with Mayor Mitchell Brownstein,  we will meet with Dalia and Cornelia to get an overview of the project. While elaborate changes are not likely given the fact the budget has already been stretched to the limit we will explore the possibility of building a mini-companion court for younger kids. JHoops is open to a possible sponsorship.

Plain and simply, the existing  court is in very poor condition and is at the end of its

lifespan.  Among the selected new equipment will be the basketball poles, backboards, front mounted  rims basketball nets and players benches.

  • Removing the existing cracked asphalt and install six inches of MG-20 crushed stone to

maintain a slop of one percent for better drainage;

  • Install  new asphalt;
  • Install two coats of epoxy paint acrylic surface;
  • Install new basketball sets, including the two new poles and two steel fan-shaped basketball boards with double rim basketball goals;
  • Install a new 30-foot light projector with two LED fixtures;
  • Install two players' benches with backs;
  • Install new grass (SOD) around the perimeter of the basketball court.

The work is scheduled to start in June 2021 and to be completed  by the end of July. We had nine conforming bids

I will have more to report when Mayor Brownstein and members of the Advisory Committee meet with our staff next week.

 .


New black bins coming soon to single-family homes and duplexes

 From June to August 2021, more than 4,000 wheeled black bins will be distributed throughout Côte Saint-Luc to residents of single-family homes, duplexes, and some townhouses. These black bins will replace the existing mix of household waste bins.

 

“The collection is therefore faster and safer because the new black bin can be emptied into the garbage truck using a lift,” Mayor Mitchell Brownstein said. “The waste materials are in a closed container and out of sight. Also, the wheels will make it easier to place the black bin at the curb.”

 

NewBlackBin_CSLBranded

 

The black bins will be delivered to the front of each home, along with a bag containing an information package. Please note the materials may arrive during the week or weekend between 7am and 8pm.

 

The City will provide homes with a 240L black bin, which is the same size as most of the blue bins currently in use in the city. If a resident prefers a smaller 120L black bin, they can complete a form online at cotesaintluc.org/blackbins. A 240L black bin can hold approximately five regular outdoor garbage bags. A 120L bin can hold approximately three regular outdoor garbage bags.

 

“The City intends to maintain the once-a-week schedule for waste collection for now,” said Councillor Sidney Benizri, who the council member responsible for Public Works. “If you’re not sure which size bin to get, choose the standard 240L black bin. This is also easier as you don’t need to inform us because the 240L is the default size.”

 

Once the new black bins go into service, residents will no longer be able to place garbage bags on the side of bins, as the City will not collect them. Estimates show that about 80 percent of household waste is either recyclable (blue bin) or compostable (brown bin). Only 20 percent is residual waste (black bin). Remember, if you need a larger blue bin or brown bin, the City will exchange it for free.

 

The City will be mailing information flyers to the single-family homes and duplexes affected by the change. Some—but not all—townhouses will also be affected.

 

For more information, visit cotesaintluc.org/blackbins.

 

 

Nouveaux bacs roulants noirs seront bientôt distribués

 

De juin à août 2021, plus de 4 000 bacs roulants noirs seront distribués sur tout le territoire de Côte Saint-Luc aux résidents des maisons unifamiliales et des duplex, en plus de certaines maisons en rangée. Ces bacs noirs remplaceront tous les bacs à ordures existants.

 

« La collecte va être plus rapide et sécuritaire parce que le nouveau bac noir peut être vidé dans le camion à ordures à l’aide d’un mécanisme de levage. Les déchets sont dans un contenant fermé et à l’abri des regards. Enfin, les roues facilitent le placement des bacs noirs en bordure de la rue, » explique le Maire Mitchell Brownstein.

 

Les bacs noirs seront livrés devant chaque maison, avec un sac contenant une trousse d’information. La livraison se fera pendant la semaine ou le week-end, entre 7 h et 20 h.

 

La ville fournira aux foyers un bac noir de 240L, qui est de la même taille que la plupart des bacs bleues actuellement utilisées dans la ville. Si vous trouvez le bac de 240L trop grand, vous pouvez demander un bac noir de 120L à la place. Faites la demande à cotesaintluc.org/fr/bacsnoirs. Un bac noir de 240 litres peut contenir environ cinq sacs à ordures ordinaires. Une poubelle de 120 litres peut contenir environ trois sacs à ordures ordinaires.

 

« La ville a l'intention de maintenir l’horaire d’une fois par semaine.  Si vous n'êtes pas sûr quel bac à choisir, optez pour le bac noir de 240 litres. C'est également plus facile car c’est la taille par défaut » a déclaré le conseiller Sidney Benizri, membre du conseil responsable des travaux publics.

 

Une fois que les nouveaux bacs noirs seront en service, vous ne devez pas déposer de sacs à ordures à côté car la Ville ne les ramassera pas. On estime qu’environ 80 % des déchets ménagers sont soit recyclables (bac bleu), soit compostables (bac brun). Seuls 20 % sont des déchets résiduels (bac noir). N’oubliez pas que si vous avez besoin d’un bac bleu ou d’un bac brun plus grand, la Ville vous l’échangera gratuitement.

 

La Ville enverra des dépliants d'information aux maisons unifamiliales et aux duplex touchés par ce changement. Certaines maisons de ville—mais pas toutes—seront également concernées.

 

Pour en savoir plus, consultez cotesaintluc.org/fr/bacsnoirs.

 

Le bac noir doit être utilisé uniquement pour les déchets qui ne peuvent pas être réutilisés, recyclés, ou compostés. En général, il s’agit de déchets solides et non dangereux qui ne peuvent pas être recyclés ou compostés et qui ne sont pas acceptés par les organismes dont la mission est de donner une seconde vie à certains objets.

 

 

 


Caldwell Provisions to become Supermarché PA  Côte Saint-Luc next fall

Caldwell Provisions, the popular neighbourhood grocery store located on Caldwell and Kildare Road, will take over the entire strip mall by fall 2021  and be rebranded as Supermarché PA Côte Saint-Luc.

Owner George Sparagis said  the existing tenants, CSL Bagel, a drycleaner, a hairdresser and a chocolate shop, will all be integrated into the new design, which will expand to three storeys. The former Pharmaprix , bakery  and synagogue storefronts are already empty.

 

CaldwellGeorgeandRachel
George and Rachel celebrate the exciting news.

 

Sparagis made the deal with Supermarché PA when they unsuccessfully tried to lure away his head chef Sophie and head cashier Rachel.  

By engaging in this partnership, Sophie will in fact become the executive chef for all of the Supermarché PA stores. They will also carry CSL Bagel and Le Petit Jardin  products.

“This is a dream come true,” CSL Bagel owner Seth Eliahoo told me through his glass window. Seth has employed rigid safety measures since the start of the pandemic. He does not even let his financée inside.

 

Seth
Seth contemplates great things ahead for his bagel empire.

 

Mayor Mitchell Brownstein was privately involved in the negotiations and promised to bring to Council a proposal to place a very large billboard on the roof of the building to increase visibility.

Supernarché PA will also purchase naming rights to the Samuel Moskovitch Arena. The ice surface itself will be known as the Supermarché PA Rink and that will be emblazoned on the scoreboard.

While small in size compared to the major grocery stores, Caldwell Provisions has cornered the market  on fresh ready to eat meals via Chef Sophie and some of the best cut fruit in town thanks to assistant manager Spiro and his team. Many clients do their regular grocery order here by phone and as a result Sparagis has multiple delivery trucks out at a time.

The staff are extremely friendly and they greet all regular customers by name.

Sparagis started working at the store when he attended nearby Wagar High School and eventually bought the place. He is a hands on owner who can be seen on site seven days a week.

Now this would be an absolutely excellent idea for the strip mall, but at this point I must simply say “April Fool’s Day.” However, on that note I would certainly welcome Caldwell Provisions taking over the  storefront formerly occupied by Pharmaprix so they can double in size. As for CSL Bagel, Eliahoo created a superb brand and expansion is indeed merited.


Great news for democracy: vote by mail approved for those 70 and over in municipal elections

Score a victory for democracy-- well partial democracy.

Côte Saint-Luc assumed a leadership role in calling for the Quebec government to allow voting by mail in our November municipal elections for everyone who wishes, given the uncertainty of where we will be with the COVID-19 pandemic next fall. Thanks to the opposition Quebec Liberals, a compromise was reached. It is far from perfect, but it will help many of our electorate.

Here is a story in The Montreal Gazette that summarizes the decision.

Should the COVID-19 pandemic drag on even longer, Quebec wants cities and towns to be ready to hold their Nov. 7 elections anyway. This week the National Assembly passed a bill making the campaign rules more flexible.

 

 

QUEBEC — With the COVID-19 pandemic lingering, the Legault government has given cities more flexibility in the organization of the November municipal elections, including the authority to allow citizens over the age of 70 to vote by mail.

MNAs this week adopted Bill 85 which, among things, gives municipalities the option of offering the mail-in ballot option to older citizens. Municipalities have to pass a council resolution opting for mail-in balloting by July 1 to make it happen.

The expanded mail-in option was added at the last minute in the form of an amendment, which passed Wednesday in a vote. The score was 118 MNAs for, zero against.

The bill’s passage was overshadowed this week by the presentation of the Quebec budget.

“It is difficult to know what the public health situation will be for the next general municipal election,” Municipal Affairs Minister Andrée Laforest said in a statement to the Montreal Gazette.

 

“As minister, I had to put in place the conditions to ensure this major event happens. Regardless of what happens, thanks to our Bill 85, Quebecers will be able to participate in the municipal democratic process in safety and knowing the integrity of the vote is assured.”

The amendment to the bill was proposed by the Liberal MNA for Vaudreuil, Marie-Claude Nichols, the critic for municipal affairs. The government accepted the amendment.

It expands the scope of the mail-in ballot option. The initial bill, tabled in February, had the option but only for seniors living in CHSLDs or private nursing homes and people with reduced mobility who can’t travel.

In the debate over the bill, Nichols said her own 76-year-old mother would be afraid to go to a polling station if the pandemic was still happening. Nichols wanted the amendment to including to anyone over 65.

Elections Quebec indicated it would not have time to organize such a system for this election. The compromise was age 70. Elections Quebec had the same view on the issue of electronic or internet voting, which the minister Laforest also favours. There would not be enough time to put the system in place.

Elections Quebec polling shows about 50 per cent of Quebecers support the idea of electronic voting. In the 18-to-34 year-old category, the number is 76 per cent. The tool is seen as a way to boost low participation rates.

Bill 85, however, includes other clauses to ease voting in a pandemic.

To take into consideration voting by mail, the election period is expanded from 44 days in total to 51. Additional voting days will be added to avoid crowding at polling stations.

To avoid contact, fewer election workers will be on site and it will require fewer signatures to become a candidate to avoid door-to-door contact.

Finally, voters will be allowed to use their own pencils to vote.

“The last year has taught us the importance of being able to rapidly adapt to any scenario, even those which seemed impossible,” Quebec’s chief electoral officer, Pierre Reid, said in a statement.

Voters in 1,100 municipalities including Montreal go to the polls Nov. 7 to fill 8,000 elected posts.

pauthier@postmedia.com